This month we are showcasing the following books in our Library

 

1.  THE JAY BIRDS OF FORT BEND COUNTY by Pauline Yelderman

This book focuses on the Jaybird-Woodpecker War which was a feud between two political factions for the control of Fort Bend County, Texas.  The Jaybirds, representing the wealthy Democrats who made up about 90 percent of the white population, sought to rid the county of Republicans who had gained a foothold in government during Reconstruction.  The Woodpeckers were the officials and former officials who held office as a result of the black vote for the Republican ticket, but now claimed to be Democrats and vied for control of the party.  

 

2.  OLDTIMERS:  THEIR OWN STORIES by Florence Fenley

This spellbinding collection of fifty-three true pioneer stories, originally published in 1939, brilliantly captures the history of the development of the frontier in the area of southwestern Texas from the Civil War period up to the 1930's.

 

3.  THE TRAIL DRIVERS OF TEXAS: INTERESTING SKETCHES OF EARLY COWBOYS AND THEIR EXPERIENCES  by J. Marvin Hunter

These are the chronicles of the trail drivers of Texas - those rugged men and, sometime, women who drove cattle and horses up the trails from Texas to northern markets in the late 1800's.  Gleaned from members of the Old Time Trail Drivers' Association, these hundreds of real-life stories - some humorous, some chilling, some rambling, all interesting - form an invaluable cornerstone to the literature, history, and folklore of Texas and the West.

  

4.   THE IRISH TEXANS by Jon B. Flannery 

Irish immigrants played a large part in early Texas history, largely because of a carrot-and-stick situation.  The "stick" was the political and religious persecution they were suffering at home.  The "carrot" was Texas itself, an area with enormous natural resources, but with a paucity of population - an area that was luring immigrants with cheap land in order to exploit those resources.  The Battle of Kinsale, Ireland, in 1602 began the Irish exodus from their homeland, for it ended with the English defeat of the Irish armies.  For the next 320 years, the Irish were denied both education and political representation.  The predominantly Catholic Irish were also persecuted for their religion by the Anglican English.  After the passage of the Test Act in 1703, many of the same abuses were inflicted also upon the Presbyterian Irish. Time after time the Irish attempted to overthrow English domination; time after time they were defeated.  Each defeat generated a new wave of emigration - first to France, Spain and Austria, later to New Spain and Texas.  The Potato Famine in the 1840's when Irish livestock and grain were shipped to England while the Irish starved, created an even larger tide of Irish immigration to all parts of the United States. 

 

5.   HISTORY OF HOUSTON COUNTY, TEXAS 1687-1979 by Eliza Bishop, Chairman History                 Book Committee

Table of Contents lists the following:  Introduction, General History, Homes, Churches, Schools, Community Life and Activities, Business and Economics, Texas Family Land Heritage Registry, County Markers, Family Histories, Memorial and Recognition, and Index.

 

6.   PICTORIAL SOUVENIR HISTORY OF EAST BERNARD, TEXAS by Adolph F. Urbanic

This book describes the living conditions that prevailed in 1860 in East Bernard, Texas. One of Stephen F. Austin's colonists ho received land was Tomas Slaughter and John F. Hamilton.  Part of this land is where the town of East Bernard located.  The book contains history of some of the early settlers in the area.